Who is Producing the Most Interesting Art Today?

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on Who is Producing the Most Interesting Art Today?

I believe R.C. Gorman to be the most interesting artist today because of the way he marries his marvellous use of color in combination with his subjects, which are mainly Native American (Navajo), scenes with women along with the traditional and timeless beauty of Navajo jewelry, pottery, dress and tradition as well as the inclusion in many of his works of the breathtakingly beautiful American Southwest scenery. This man is so inspiring and his works bring such joy to me each time I view them. The world would be a much emptier place without this great artist in it!
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Spotlight on The Golden Age of Illustration

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on Spotlight on The Golden Age of Illustration

His month we look at the Golden Age of Illustration, generally considered to be the period between the late 1880’s and about 1920. Technological progress had made it possible to reproduce artwork accurately and inexpensively, and there was a public demand for exceptional book and magazine illustration, much of which was geared towards younger readers. Heavily influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite artists, and especially by William Morris, many artists went beyond simple illustration to experiment with book design, designing elaborate decorative borders and custom fonts.
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Venetian Painting and the Rise of Landscape

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on Venetian Painting and the Rise of Landscape

I sketched out the crucial role which pagan mythology played in the development of Western painting at the time of the Renaissance. The rising popularity of the stories of the pagan gods and goddesses among the ruling elites of Italy can be seen as a deliberate attempt to counterbalance the dominant Biblical vision of the time. Surely, no two subjects could be further apart than the Passion of Christ and the loves of Zeus.
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The Islamic Influence on the Italian Renaissance

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on The Islamic Influence on the Italian Renaissance

Nearing the end of its run at the Getty. Glass and ceramics are called the “arts of fire” because of the heat needed to create them. Getty curator Catherine Hess explains (in a video clip) how the exhibit was born from the realization that Islamic art forms and the technology used for their development were “entirely responsible” for the development of glass and luster painted ceramics in Renaissance Italy.
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Understanding Islamic Art and its Influence

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on Understanding Islamic Art and its Influence

Three major exhibits currently on view in North American museums remind us of the greatness of the culture and civilization of the Islamic world and its transformative influence on Western Europe during the 8th to the 15th centuries.
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One rule for the Getty, another for Italy?

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on One rule for the Getty, another for Italy?

We asked Italia Nostra if their opposition to restitution of the sculpture was hypocritical in the light of Italy’s campaign to obtain antiquities from museums in the US, most notably the Getty, Metropolitan, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A spokeswoman for the conservation organisation said: “The statue of Venus was not stolen by the Italians but discovered by chance in Cyrene which was then under Italian rule…the works Italy wants returned from the Getty Museum were illegally excavated, exported in violation of the 1939 law [under a 1939 Italian law, all archaeological property excavated in Italy belongs to the Italian state] and acquired in an illegal way. The Venus is not comparable. It’s like asking for the restitution of works from the Louvre taken from Italy by Napoleon.”
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Growth in Russian market slows

•July 27, 2007 • Comments Off on Growth in Russian market slows

According to many, the emphasis is shifting to works of higher quality. The starkest example of this phenomenon was at Christie’s 14 June Russian sale, its first ever in the summer, when three paintings accounted for half the sale’s total value. While some works set records, more than one-third of the lots at both auction houses were unsold.
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